Archive for December, 2014

Fermat’s Christmas Theorem

Albert Girard (1595-1632) was a French-born mathematician who studied at the University of Leiden. He was the first to use the abbreviations ‘sin’, ‘cos’ and ‘tan’ for the trigonometric functions.

Left: Albert Girard (1595-1632). Right: Pierre de Fermat (1601-1665)

Left: Albert Girard (1595-1632). Right: Pierre de Fermat (1601-1665)

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Information Theory

That’s Maths in The Irish Times this week (TM059, or Search for “thatsmaths” at irishtimes.com) is about data compression and its uses in modern technology.

Left: An equation form Shannon (1948), the paper that launched Information Theory.  Right: Claude Shannon (1916-2001) ©Alcatel-Lucent.

Left: An equation form Shannon (1948), the paper that launched Information Theory.
Right: Claude Shannon (1916-2001) ©Alcatel-Lucent.

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New Curves for Old: Inversion

Special Curves

A large number of curves, called special curves, have been studied by mathematicians. A curve is the path traced out by a point moving in space. To keep things simple, we assume that the point is confined to two-dimensional Euclidean space {\mathbb{R}^2} so that it generates a plane curve as it moves. This, a curve results from a mapping {\mathbf{\gamma} : [a,b]\longrightarrow \mathbb{R}^2}. Continue reading ‘New Curves for Old: Inversion’

The Year of George Boole

This week’s That’s Maths column in The Irish Times (TM058, or search for “thatsmaths” at irishtimes.com) is about George Boole, the first Professor of Mathematics at Queen’s College Cork.

Boole-Year-UCC-Small Continue reading ‘The Year of George Boole’


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